Legacy Eye Care
Modernized Optometry, Affordable Quality Care

Pediatric Care

Pediatric Vision


PEDIATRIC VISION — EYE EXAMINATIONS FOR CHILDREN

The American Optometric Association recommends that pre-school children receive a complete vision exam at the ages of six — twelve months, three years and five years. It is particularly important that a child have a complete evaluation prior to entry into Kindergarten. While in school, yearly evaluations are recommended. It is not necessary for the child to verbally respond in order to do an evaluation. The American Optometric Association (AOA) and The Vision Care Institute of Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc., have partnered to create InfantSEE®, a no-cost public health program developed to provide professional eye care for infants six — twelve months of age. Through InfantSEE®, Dr. Royer will provide a one-time, comprehensive eye assessment to infants, offering early detection of potential eye and vision problems at no cost regardless of income. For more information on InfantSEE®, go to www.aoa.org/infantsee.xml


COMPREHENSIVE EYE AND VISION EXAMINATION

Please visit http://www.aoa.org/ for more information on comprehensive eye exams.


RECOMMENDED EYE EXAMINATION FREQUENCY FOR PEDIATRIC PATIENTS

Patient Age

Examination Interval

Asymptomatic/Risk Free

At Risk

Birth to 24 Months

At 6 months of age

By 6 months of age or as recommended

2 to 5 years

At 3 years of age

At 3 years of age or as recommended

6 to 18 years

Before first grade and every two years thereafter

Annually or as recommended


Children considered to be at risk for the development of eye and vision problems may need additional testing or more frequent re-evaluation. Factors placing an infant, toddler, or child at significant risk for visual impairment include:

  • Prematurity, low birth weight, oxygen at birth, grade III or IV intraventricular hemorrhage

  • Family history of retinoblastoma, congenital cataracts, or metabolic or genetic disease

  • Infection of mother during pregnancy (e.g., rubella, toxoplasmosis, venereal disease, herpes, cytomegalovirus, or AIDS)

  • Difficult or assisted labor, which may be associated with fetal distress or low Apgar scores

  • High refractive error

  • Strabismus

  • Anisometropia

  • Known or suspected central nervous system dysfunction evidenced by developmental delay, cerebral palsy, dysmorphic features, seizures, or hydrocephalus http://www.aoa.org/infantsee.xml